Still life story by Sophia Bratt and Osman Tahir nods to sustainable consumption

POETIC STILL LIFE STORY BY SOPHIA BRATT AND 

OSMAN TAHIR NODS TO SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION  

INSPIRATION


Interior decorator Sophia Bratt and photographer Osman Tahir have taken inspiration from timeless design and traditional craft when creating the still life story New, old and old new for The New Era. The textile throughout the story is leftovers from textile producers Astrid, and the furniture is from Nordiska Galleriet. The tapestries are sewn and embroided by Bratt. In this image Bratt has styled a Cameleonda sofa section and a Persimon table lamp by Note Design for Fogia.

Stylist, set designer and interior decorator Sophia Bratt has a background in textile and pattern cutting, and worked as a milliner before changing direction to work with interiors. Today she works with a large variety of customers on everything from commercials to curating exhibitions and styling moody interiors. For The New Era she has created a beautiful still life story together with photographer Osman Tahir, who is also a painter. What binds the duo together is their simple and raw compositions, highlighting the incredible craftsmanship in the carefully curated objects. Ahead of the shoot, Bratt sew the tapestries from leftover textile. ”Creating on a pure feeling is something that has always appealed to me,” says Bratt. ”What inspires me most is when the story and brand lift each other in an image. When there is symphony and balance. You know it’s good when you get a tingling feeling in the tummy.”

WORDS

PHOTOGRAPHY

STYLING

Hanna Nova Beatrice

Osman Tahir

Sophia Bratt

Selected furniture is a Dux bed with Tekla Percale Duvet cover, Cassina 523 taburett meribel in American walnut and lamp Akari 26N. 

TNE           What is the main idea behind this still life created for The New Era?

SB              “Osman and I wanted to work with textiles and let them be the foundation of a still life. The main idea was to use leftover textile from the Swedish textile producer Astrid, and sew tapestries from it. We found this large and nice location with arches, and hand picked furniture and products that we think stand for quality and tradition. I get really inspired by the opportunity to work in different teams, with different photographers and customers.”

TNE           When it comes to your clients, can you see a change coming?

SB              ”The market is much more aware about quality and people invest in sustainable objects and furniture to a much greater extent than before.  People want to make good choices and feel good about what they buy. I get the feeling that the interest in fast consumption is fading. The pandemic has spurred on this development. However, it doesn’t always go hand in hand with our need to quickly get inspired via social media, where images of interiors and objects really triggers us.”

The textile is a foundation for the still life. Here combined with a a Luminiere Piccola lamp, Epic coffee table by Gubi and Shaggy Labyrinth rug by Dusty Deco. 

TNE              Where do you get your inspiration from?

SB              ”I can get inspiration in so many different ways, everything from conversations that can float away to a material that captures me. I love to go into my creative world and create little stories just for me, where a surface, a material a colour, a package can be the start of something. Like in this story when Osman and I were completely into textiles and raw materials and making something soft and beautiful out of it.
This love affair with textiles, sewing and embroidery is something I have bubbling in me now."

TNE              What are your customers requesting today?

SB              "Often something unique that makes people think and see something more than a picture. Storytelling, sustainability and quality could be put as key words in many briefs right now."

The duo only picked timeless design which adds a poetic expression to the story, such as the B&B Cameleonda sofa in olive green and Panthella lamp by Louise Poulsen. 


”The market is much more aware about quality and people invest in sustainable objects and furniture to a much greater extent than before. People want to make good choices. I get the feeling that the interest in fast consumption is fading. The pandemic has spurred on this development. ”

Above: H chair by Dusty Deco and Block sofa designed by Atelier Alba for Fogia. Right: Figurine bar stool by Note Design and Combiplex table, both for Fogia. 


SUGGESTIONS


2021.08.26
2021.07.28
2021.07.23
2021.07.19
2021.07.11
2021.07.11
2021.07.07
2021.06.28